Migliore Pasticceria, great cakes for your parties

Having a party? Be sure to head out to visit la Migliore Pasticceria Roma Nord to taste the best cakes and sweets of the italian City.

Read a nice article on how they make the so called “Gingerpaste”, The techniques described in this article is from Elaine B. Jenkinspasticceria

Foreword: ” Gingerpaste” is an exciting new a term that I developed when using construction gingerbread dough as if it were cold porcelain or salt dough.   No specialist tools are required, just those already in your workbox! Read more about this exciting new technique…

 I first began working in sugar about 15 years ago. My husband and I moved to Portsmouth (Hants) from the USA in early 1993. At that point, I joined the British Sugarcraft Guild and began taking lots of classes, including Cities and Guilds 7900. I also began working in catering roma salt dough.

 In 1998, we returned to the United States, settling near Orlando, Florida. In early 1998 I took some classes at the Florida ICES Mini Classes called Miglior Catering Roma , with Geraldine Randlesome, in cold porcelain.

In late 1998, I volunteered to demonstrate gingerbread at a Florida ICES Day of Sharing. The organizer, Grace Jones (ICES Show Co-Director of Pasticceria Roma when the convention was held in Orlando), asked me to try a “Florida-proof” recipe for gingerbread that had appeared in a US publication, ‘Mailbox News.’ The magazine article discussed using the dough for building houses, not for modeling.  My first impression, when working with this dough in catering, was its similarity to cold porcelain and salt dough. I immediately began to explore its possibilities, and am continually discovering new ways to use this intriguing medium.

This is my version of the original recipe. I have since found several versions of this recipe in other sources.

 GINGERPASTE

275 g plain flour

160 g strong or bread flour

225 g caster sugar

2 eggs, size 2

84 g honey

3/4 tsp each cinnamon, ground cloves, ginger

By a food processor (steel blade) or Kenwood mixer: Sift all dry ingredients together and mix thoroughly. Beat eggs in a bowl, and mix in the honey. Add liquid mixture to dry ingredients. Mixture will be very stiff within 30 seconds, and will resemble wet sand. Remove dough from mixer.

By hand: Sift all dry ingredients together and mix thoroughly. Beat eggs in a bowl, and mix in the honey. Add liquid mixture to dry ingredients. If unable to mix, add 1T honey. Do not add much honey or dough will be too sticky to work with. Knead dough on a floured board to combine ingredients. Mixture will resemble wet sand.

For both methods: Place dough in a plastic bag, and let stand at room temperature a few hours or overnight until the honey is totally absorbed by the flour.

Tips for working with gingerpaste:

(1) Gingerpaste is easiest to handle when slightly warmer than room temperature. It can be warmed in the microwave, airing cupboard, or placed near a radiator.

(2) Do not roll gingerpaste out too thinly. Use a cornflour bag to dust board before rolling out gingerpaste. Use the same bag to dust the gingerpaste before rolling, veining, frilling, texturing, etc. Gingerpaste usually needs to be dusted before each procedure.

(3) Gingerpaste may be rolled through a pasta machine. Dust both machine and paste with a cornflour bag between each roll.

(4) Gingerpaste will shrink approximately 10% after baking.

(5) Baking gingerpaste is not an exact science. Begin by baking a piece for 1 hour at 110C, then another hour at 120C. Then, assess the hardness and colour of the piece, and perhaps continue baking at 130C, checking frequently to avoid burning the paste. Some larger, thicker pieces may require baking 5 hours or more. The longest baking periods should be at the lowest temperatures.

(6) To decrease baking time, pieces may be air-dried. Dehydrators also shorten the baking process.

(7) The pieces may appear dusty after baking. Application of a thin coat of Gildesol removes the dust and gives the pieces a gentle shine.

YOU WILL NEED:

4″ and 8″ square cakes, covered in Squires Kitchen Marzipan and Sugarpaste

2 12″ gold cake boards, glued together; covered in Squires Kitchen Sugarpaste, then edged in ribbon

Ribbons for edges of boards and cakes

18 ribbon double loops

1 recipe Gingerpaste

Small amounts cinnamon, ginger, ground cloves

Squires Kitchen Dust Colour: red (use a shade complementary to board ribbon)

Squires Kitchen Metallic Lustre Dust: Light Gold

Small amount gin or isopropyl alcohol

Edible glue or boiled water

 GINGERPASTE FLOWERS AND LEAVES REQUIRED

5 full roses

12 carnations

10 small trails of ivy

10 small stems of eucalyptus

 THE CAKE:

  1. Mix an equal amount (I used 1/2 tsp each) of cinnamon, ginger and ground cloves with enough gin or isopropyl alcohol to make a runny solution. Use a stenciling brush to splatter the cakes and boards with spots of the spice/alcohol mixture. Leave to dry.
  2. Make similar solutions of the red dust and the Light Gold Lustre Dust with the alcohol. Use the same stenciling brush to splatter the cakes and boards with the red and gold mixtures, allowing the cake to dry thoroughly between colours.
  3. When cakes and board are dry, assemble the cakes; centring them on the board with the largest cake on the bottom.
  4. Apply ribbons around the board and the cakes.
  5. Attach a small lump of sugarpaste to the base of each cake, centring them on each side panel. Arrange the flowers as follows:

Bottom panel: 1 rose, 2 ivy sprays, 2 ribbon sprays

Top layer: 3 carnations, 2 eucalyptus stems, 2 ribbon sprays

  1. Top ornament: Assemble ornament by placing a small lump of sugarpaste on the bottom disc. Attach the heart to the back of the paste, using a strong edible glue. Arrange the flowers as follows: 1 rose, 2 ivy sprays, 2 eucalyptus stems, 2 double ribbon loops.

 MAKING THE TOP ORNAMENT:

 Materials:

Gingerpaste

Quilting stitch roller

Rule

PME Knife/Shell tool

Gildesol

 

  1. Roll out gingerpaste to a 1/8″ thickness on parchment paper. Using templates, cut out 1 each of the heart and circle shapes. Cut out 10 circles using the TinkerTech 2 circle cutter 293.

 

  1. Use the ruler and quilting stitch roller to create a diamond stitch pattern on the smaller of each of the heart and circle shapes. Centre the smaller shapes on top of the larger ones.

 

  1. Cut the 10 circles in half. Use the PME Knife to make a series of even lines perpendicular to the cut in each half circle. Attach these half-circles evenly around both the heart and the circle shapes.
  2. Bake the pieces, checking them to ensure they bake evenly. If bubbles appear whilst baking, pop them using a clean needle. Try to insert the needle at the site of a stitch. Allow to cool, then paint or rub with a thin coat of Gildesol.

 

EUCALYPTUS

 

Materials:

Gingerpaste

18 g wires, cut into quarters

26 g wires, cut into fifths

Brown floristry tape

Gildesol

 

Equipment:

TinkerTech 2 rose cutters 349-352

Great Impressions Tea Rose leaf veiner

Metal ball tool (or equivalent)

Celpad

Large baking tray lined with crumpled tinfoil (ungreased)

 

  1. Roll out a ball of gingerpaste onto a ridged board duster with cornflour.. Cut out some of the required leaf shapes, ensuring that the ridge travels vertically through the center of the leaf.

 

  1. Take a piece of 26g wire and insert into the ridge. Dust leaf and veiner with cornflour before veining. Soften the edges of the leaf on a Celpad with a metal ball tool (or equivalent).

 

  1. Place completed leaf on tinfoil. a crumpled up piece of tinfoil (ungreased).

The tinfoil is crumpled so as to give slight movement to each leaf.

 

  1. Bake in cooker until done. Leaves are done when they have turned a brownish colour and do not stick to the tinfoil. Remove tray from cooker and allow leaves to cool.
  2. Tape wires of leaves, using half width brown tape.

 

  1. Paint or rub a very fine coat of Gildesol on both sides of each leaf.

 

  1. To assemble, attach a length of half width brown tape to an 18g wire, leaving about 1″ free at the end of the wire. Using small scissors cut this free piece of tape in half lengthwise. Twist each quarter width length of tape, forming two small curly strands. Just below the strands, attach one pair of the smallest leaves, as opposites. As you work down the stem, attach larger and larger pairs of leaves.

 

  1. Bend both the stem and the leaves in order to give a natural appearance to the eucalyptus.

 

IVY

 

Materials:

Gingerpaste

26 g wire, cut into fifths

18g wire, cut into quarters

Brown floristry tape

Gildesol

 

Equipment:

TinkerTech 2 ivy cutters 263-265, 587

Great Impressions Ivy Succinata leaf veiner

Metal ball tool (or equivalent)

Celpad

Large baking tray lined with crumpled tinfoil (ungreased)

 

  1. Roll out a ball of gingerpaste onto a ridged board dusted with cornflour. Cut out some of the required leaf shapes, ensuring that the ridge travels vertically through the centre of the leaf.

 

  1. Take a piece of 26g wire and insert into the ridge. Dust leaf and veiner with cornflour before use. Soften the edges of the leaf on a Celpad with a metal ball tool (or equivalent).

 

  1. Place completed leaf on tinfoil. a crumpled up piece of tinfoil (ungreased).

The tinfoil is crumpled so as to give slight movement to each leaf.

 

  1. Bake in cooker until done. Leaves are done when they have turned a brownish colour and do not stick to the tinfoil. Remove tray from cooker and allow leaves to cool.

 

  1. Tape leaf wires, using half width brown tape.

 

  1. Paint or rub a very fine coat of Gildesol on both sides of each leaf.

 

  1. To assemble, attach a length of half width brown tape to an 18g wire, leaving about 1″ free at the end of the wire. Using small scissors cut this free piece of tape in half lengthwise. Twist each quarter width length of tape, forming two small curly strands. Just below the strands, attach one of the smallest leaves. Attach, as alternates, larger and larger leaves as you work down the stem..

 

  1. Bend both the stem and the leaves in order to give a natural appearance to the ivy.

 

 

ROSE

 

Materials:

Gingerpaste

18 g wire, cut into quarters

Brown floristry tape

Gildesol

Equipment:

TinkerTech 2 Rose Petal cutters 278, 279

TinkerTech 2 Rose Calyx cutter 245

Holly Products ceramic texturing tool

Metal ball tool

Celpad

Baking tray lined with tinfoil (ungreased)

 

  1. Begin by taking a piece of gingerpaste and shape it into a cone (it should fit within the smallest petal). Take a piece of 18g wire and make a hook in one end. Insert hooked end into broad end of cone, and smooth inserted area of gingerpaste around the wire. Leave to hang, upside down, for a day or two. Then, place on the baking tray and bake at 200F for one hour, then 225F for one hour. This baking ensures that the cone will provide enough support to the petals when they are attached.

 

  1. Roll out a knob of gingerpaste (not too thinly) and cut one petal using the smaller cutter. Texture the petal, using the Holly Products ceramic texturing tool, on a Celpad; then use the metal ball tool to soften the edges of the petal. Moisten the bottom inside third of the petal, and place the cone against it, leaving a small amount of petal above the top of the cone.   Wrap the left-hand side of the petal in towards the cone (making quite a tight twist to ensure that the top of the cone cannot be seen). Wrap the rest of the petal around quite tightly. Dry (overnight) before proceeding.

 

  1. Cut out two more petals using the smaller cutter.   Texture and soften as before. Moisten the central part of both petals. Place one against a dried cone, and leave at least 1/4 ” of the petal above the tip of the previous petal. Attach one side of the petal, leave the other free, and tuck the second petal under the free edge. Wrap the rest of the second petal around, overlapping the first petal’s attached edge. Allow to dry (overnight) before proceeding.

 

  1. Cut out three more petals using the smaller cutter. Texture and soften the edges as before. Moisten their bases, and attach these petals, wrapping and overlapping as before.

Make sure that the petals are fairly even. Stop here, and attach the calyx if this is to be a bud. Do not attach the calyx at this stage if making a full rose.

 

Whether a bud with calyx or a partial rose, allow this stage to dry (24 hours), and then bake in the cooker for 1 hour at 110C, then 1 hour at 120C. The best way is to hook the end of the wire, and hang the hook over the wires of the cooker racks. This will not work if the flower has not air dried – the flower will slip off the wire! Baking the incomplete flower at this point provides the strength needed for the next stages and gives the centre of the flower a slightly darker appearance, for more realism. Allow to cool.

 

  1. Cut out 4 additional petals using the larger cutter. Texture and soften the edges as before; in addition, cup the centre of each petal. Attach petals as in #4, but curl back the tops of the petals a bit more and give them more movement. The rose should be quite open at this stage. Allow to dry (overnight) before proceeding.

 

  1. Cut out 5 more petals using the large cutter. Texture and soften the edges as before, and cup the centre of the petal. Attach petals as in #5, but with even more curl and movement. Allow to dry (24 hours); bake for 1 hour at 200F, and 1 hour at 225F. These petals could be wired, baked separately and attached, if preferred. Allow to cool.

 

  1. Roll a ball of gingerpaste into a cone; pinch out the base to form a ‘Mexican hat’ shape. Use a small celstick to roll out the base. Cut out the calyx using TinkerTech Rose Calyx cutter 245. Make some fine cuts in the edges of each sepal using small scissors. The number of cuts should be irregular, as only a wild rose has an exact number on each sepal. Moisten the centre of the calyx and attach it to the bottom of the rose. Make sure the sepals cover up as many petal joins as possible. The buds’ sepals should be attached to the bud; the full rose would have sepals curved back.

 

  1. Bake the completed rose again. Allow to cool .

 

  1. Tape the stem, using full width brown tape. If desired, make the stem thicker by attaching kitchen towel before taping.

 

  1. Paint a very fine coat of Gildesol on all sides of flower and calyx.

 

CARNATION

 

Materials:

Gingerpaste

24 g wire, cut into quarters

Brown floristry tape

Gildesol

 

Equipment:

Orchard Products Carnation cutters C1 and C1M

Holly Products ceramic silk texturing tool

Celpad

 

  1. Take a tiny amount of gingerpaste (small pea size), roll into a cone, and place on the end of a 24g wire. Allow to dry (overnight).
  2. Cut out one shape using the smaller Orchard Products Carnation cutter. Use small scissors to emphasize each cut in the edge of the flower shape. Place shape onto a Celpad. Thin and texture the paste, using the Holly Products ceramic silk texturing tool.
  3. Thread the wire through the center of the paste. Fold the paste in half, edge to edge. You should now have a half-moon shape mounted on the wire. Fold the outer third of the halfmoon to the centre. Turn the flower to the other side and fold the remaining third to the centre. Gently mould the base of the flower around the wire into a rounded shape.

Allow to dry (overnight) before proceeding.

  1. Cut out one shape using the larger Orchard Products Carnation cutter. Repeat steps #2 and #3. Again, allow to dry overnight before proceeding.
  2. For the calyx, roll a pea-size amount of gingerpaste into a cone. Hollow out the centre of the cone enough to accommodate the base of the flower.
  3. Use small scissors to cut the edge of the cone/calyx into small points. Insert the flower into the calyx. Allow to dry (overnight); then bake. Allow to cool.
  4. Tape stem, using half width brown floral tape. Paint flower with a thin coat of Gildesol.

Equipment:

TinkerTech 2 cutters 263-265, 587

Great Impressions Ivy Succinata veiner

Metal ball tool (or equivalent)

Celpad

Large baking tray lined with crumpled tinfoil (ungreased)